What Your Driving Says About Your Personality And Communication Style.

I will start with stories about a 3 drivers;



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Driver 1: The "No signal" driver.

Driver 1 drives like everyone can mind read. He moves from lane to lane without letting others know his next move with his turn signals. He does not necessarily take note of his surroundings and expects others to adjust to him. Driver 1 has been in so many accidents, his insurance is through the roof. He blames these accidents on other drivers; "Well they weren't watching where they were going.","They didn't wait for me to completely merge.", "They are terrible drivers." He doesn't recognize how his lack of proper communication contributes to these crashes.


Driver 2: The "Slow on the fast lane" driver.

Driver 2 is moving at 40MPH on the fast lane. She wants to fit in and is worried about being left behind. However, she is slowing other drivers down. She recognizes this from all the hunks and stern looks from drivers who overtake her. But she doesn't budge, she has to keep up. She doesn't want to look like a weakling who gives up fast. She speeds up, but inevitably slows down again. Drivers around her are frustrated.


Driver 3: The "Beautiful exterior, messy interior" driver.

Driver 3 takes time to make sure her car looks perfect. She has a custom paint job and flashy rims, goes to the car wash every other day, and parks her car away from other to avoid scratches. She gets comments on her car all the time and loves the attention. However, no one can see the inside through the deeply tinted windows. If they could, they would recognize the mess that is the interior.


Something about their driving style speaks to who they are and how they relate with others. Driver 1 doesn't take responsibility for anything. Everyone is to blame for each of his missteps. He does not communicate and doesn't think it is necessary to. Because of his personality and lack of communication, he has lost opportunities and relationships. He expects others to understand him with the minimal information he provides. Driver 2 is a nervous wreck who is in a silent battle with her peers. She's so concerned about being left behind that she doesn't see she's holding herself back. She's holding those relying on her back. She's afraid to ask for help because she doesn't want to appear weak. Lastly, Driver 3. She's pretty on the outside, but messy on the inside. She wears the most expensive clothes, face beat to the gods, nails always on point and hair on fleek. But this is all a facade. She feels empty on the inside and keeps away from other to avoid getting hurt.


Who are you as a driver? Are you the fast driver in the fast lane doing your own thing? Are you the driver who cusses people out? Are you the driver pushing your car past its limit? Do you take care of your car? Do you invest time in your car to make sure its clean outside and inside? What are you doing on a daily basis to be mindful? These are questions you should spend time reflecting on.


The way you treat you car and communicate with other drivers around you is reflective of how you treat yourself and others around you. Take time out to observe your interactions and make necessary adjustments. If you don't know what to adjust, ask for feedback from trusted ones around you. Ask for help. An eye cannot see itself, you need a mirror to see your own reflection. Be intentional and make use of the resources available to you. Take steps to be 1% better today.

 

Food For Thought: "You can not eat your cake and have your cake."





 






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